Burnout by Contextual Switch

Since becoming a manager about a year ago, I’ve found that in any given week, I cycle through the following emotions: Overwhelmed with too many things to do and not enough time to do them Immense, extreme pride in my team Annoyed by tasks/myself/other people Calm (when I’ve completed my to-do list) Way in over my head with responsibilities Excited about how many fun and important things I’m getting to work on Like I want to get in bed for 5 years Love and gratitude for my coworkers Like I’m the worst manager/employee ever Like I might actually have something to say and teach people — Sophie Shepherd: http://sophieshepherd. »

Optimal rate of growth

Virtually all natural systems, from ecosystems to animals to organizations, have intrinsically optimal rates of growth. The optimal rate is far less than the fastest possible growth. When growth becomes excessive—as it does in cancer—the system itself will seek to compensate by slowing down; perhaps putting the organization’s survival at risk in the process. Peter Senge »

Craftsmanship, design, and code

… If you don’t mind, I wanted to ask you a specific question thats been bothering me for a long time. There are front-end developers and there are UI/UX designers. As I understand it, UI/UX designers come up with how things should look and front-end developers implement their vision. What if I can design and code? What if I want to conceive experiences and implement them? Is it true that most companies don’t encourage that? »

Jen Simmons about learning new technology

When I am trying to learn a new technology, it’s easy to Google and look at a tutorial and read some code. What’s hard is to really wrap my head around why I want to use which thing. That’s frequently the thing that’s not well-explained or well-documented. Jen Simmons »

Author image Andrew Kovalenko on #quote,